Tesla and Holmes: An Interview with Author Martin Hill Ortiz

Martin Hill Ortiz has written many novels that explore the thrilling side of history. Açedrex editor Jessica Knauss asked him about his process and his literary heroes.  A Predator’s Game debuted on March 30.

 

JK: What’s special or different about writing a prequel? Was the inspiration or process the same?

MHO: While putting together the publicity for the first book, A Predatory Mind, I assembled the research I had undertaken into the lives of Nikola Tesla and Henry H. Holmes and I realized just how fascinating they are. They had taken up maybe ten percent of the first novel and they were the best part. I decided to devote an entire novel to their interaction.

Instead of a prequel, I chose to take an event that was mentioned in passing in the first novel—that Holmes had gone to New York and stolen Tesla’s invention—and make that into a full story. The form is sometimes called a “throughquel,” but that’s an ugly word.

JK: Do you feel a special responsibility to get it accurate because you’re using real people as characters?

MHO: My answer might seem strange: with Tesla, yes; with Holmes, no.

Tesla was wonderfully contradictory: two parts saint, a man who set as his goal the betterment of the world; and one part intolerant who couldn’t deal with individuals. As Linus Van Pelt once said in an old Peanuts comic: “I love mankind, it’s people I can’t stand.” I wanted to be true to Tesla’s character.

Holmes, on the other hand, was an inveterate liar and exactly who he was is up for debate. It is possible he was a rank, measly sadist and I didn’t want to write him out that way—I didn’t want to spend time with that character. It is possible he was not terribly bright. Medical education was different in the nineteenth century. In 1869, when some at Harvard Medical School proposed to include a written final exam, the dean complained that “more than half of them [the students] can barely write.” I created a Holmes character for my novel who was more suave, more intelligent, and more self-disciplined than the murderer. I made him reflect Moriarty.

 

I have posted extensively on my blog about the lives of Tesla and Holmes.

JK: Do you write for yourself or for your readers?

MHO: I write for my readers. I want to tell a good story and I am happy enough when that is accomplished. I am the first of my readers, so I am demanding in satisfying myself.

JK: What is your least favorite word?

MHO: Unmicrowaveable.

JK: Do you have a favorite author?

MHO: I used to. I used to read up everything a particular author has written. Two of these were James Thurber and Milan Kundera. Now I find myself author jumping, trying to sample a hundred and one authors to see more of what’s out there. I spent a considerable time last year reading selections from the list of the all-time best mysteries. It was a topic of my blog and I managed to scratch off my reading list another forty of the hundred best.

This year I have told myself I will read up on the works by female fiction authors and more contemporary novels. So I’ve been reading Laurie R. King, Sarah Waters, and Marisha Pessl, along with some others.

JK: What are you currently working on?

MHO: I have the sequel to Never Kill A Friend almost finished. Then I’ll crank a short story or two I’ve been waiting to write. After that I’ve been plotting a Y/A magical realism novel in the back of my mind.

JK: We’ll all look forward to those!

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A Predator’s Game is available in ebook and softcover in the following venues:

Kindle | NookKobo

Indiebound SoftcoverSoftcover | Amazon Softcover

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Thrilling! A Predator’s Game Now Available

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A Predator’s Game, long-awaited prequel to A Predatory Mind, was released March 30. You can order it now and get it instantly for Kindle, Nook, or Kobo. Be sure you’re ready to chase clues all over turn-of-the-century Manhattan! For slightly delayed gratification, order the softcover at the links below (more coming soon) or request at your local bookstore or library.

Kindle | NookKobo

Softcover | Amazon Softcover | Indiebound Softcover

Manhattan, 1896.

When the author Arthur Conan Doyle meets Nikola Tesla he finds a tall, thin genius with a photographic memory and a keen eye, and recognizes in the eccentric inventor the embodiment of his creation, Sherlock. Together, they team up to take on a different, evil Holmes. Multi-murderer Dr. Henry H. Holmes has escaped execution and is unleashing a reign of terror upon the city. Set in the late nineteenth century in a world of modern marvels, danger, and invention, Conan Doyle, Tesla, and the madman engage in a deadly game of wits.

Surprises at every turn and many moments that are so clever, you’ll wonder how the author came up with it. He must’ve had Arthur Conan Doyle at his shoulder as he wrote. Don’t miss it!

 

Coming March 30: A Thrilling and Cerebral Adventure

APG 1Great news for fans of Martin Hill Ortiz’s exceptionally imaginative thrillers!

A Predator’s Game, long-awaited prequel to A Predatory Mind, will be released March 30. You can preorder it now for Kindle or Kobo and get ready to chase clues all over turn-of-the-century Manhattan to end up at the classic venue for thrillers, Niagara Falls.

Kindle PreOrder | Kobo PreOrder

Manhattan, 1896.

When the author Arthur Conan Doyle meets Nikola Tesla he finds a tall, thin genius with a photographic memory and a keen eye, and recognizes in the eccentric inventor the embodiment of his creation, Sherlock. Together, they team up to take on a different, evil Holmes. Multi-murderer Dr. Henry H. Holmes has escaped execution and is unleashing a reign of terror upon the city. Set in the late nineteenth century in a world of modern marvels, danger, and invention, Conan Doyle, Tesla, and the madman engage in a deadly game of wits.

Surprises at every turn and many moments that are so clever, you’ll wonder how the author came up with it. He must’ve had Arthur Conan Doyle at his shoulder as he wrote. Don’t miss it!

Softcover | Amazon Softcover | Other stores coming soon! Request it at your local bookstore!

The Second Volume of the 50 Best Short Stories of All Time

coverHave you read the 50 best short stories of all time? The elves at Rook’s Page have been very busy trying to help you reach that goal! If you thought Volume I was good, take a look at Volume II, the most international installment of this amazing series.

In 1914, a critical moment in literature, the New York Times asked the most highly regarded authors of the day to name the best short story in the English language. Many of their responses have maintained consistent fame through time. Others have become hidden gems. All are essential literary experiences that will make you love to read again.

These masterpieces are collected here for the first time, masterfully copyedited and with an introduction by Martin Hill Ortiz, PhD.

This volume includes:
Introduction
Markheim by Robert Louis Stevenson
Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Luck of Roaring Camp by Bret Harte
The Brushwood Boy by Rudyard Kipling
Doctor Marigold by Charles Dickens
Rip Van Winkle by Washington Irving
An Unfinished Story by O. Henry
The Claws of the Tiger by Gouverneur Morris IV
The Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe
Providence and the Guitar by Robert Louis Stevenson
Bread Upon the Waters by Rudyard Kipling
Marjorie Daw by Thomas Bailey Aldrich
Love in a Mist by A. Neil Lyons
His Wife by Stephen French Whitman
Rebecca and Rowena by William Makepeace Thackeray
Master and Man by Leo Tolstoy
The Necklace by Guy de Maupassant
The Piece of String by Guy de Maupassant
Cinderella by the Brothers Grimm
The Story of Ruth Anonymous
“What is the Best Short Story?” The original article as presented in The New York Times

Some of the stories you’ll find in Volumes I (now available) and III (coming soon):
The Outcasts of Poker Flat by Bret Harte
Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
The Man Who Would Be King by Rudyard Kipling
A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
The Murders in the Rue Morgue by Edgar Allan Poe
The Ring of Thoth by Arthur Conan Doyle
The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County by Mark Twain
The Door in the Wall by H. G. Wells
Gifts of Oblivion by Dorothy Canfield
The Turn of the Screw by Henry James
A Journey by Edith Wharton
Beyond the Pale by Rudyard Kipling

The Best Short Stories Chosen in 1914 by the most prominent authors of the day, Volume II is now ready for the public at these outlets:

Kindle in the USA, Canada, UK, Australia, Japan, and India

Nook in the USA, the UK, and Europe

Kobo worldwide

 

Volume1The Best Short Stories Chosen in 1914 by the most prominent authors of the day, Volume I, is also available in ebook at the following outlets (check back soon for the soft cover edition!):

On Kindle in the USA, Canada, UK, Australia, India, and Japan

In the USA, the UK, and Europe for Nook

Worldwide at Kobo

The 50 Best Short Stories of All Time, New from Rook’s Page

Volume1Have you read the 50 best short stories of all time?

Rook’s Page Publishing is here to make it easy to meet that goal! Our first release is Volume I in a three-volume set that commemorates the hundredth anniversary of a critical moment in the history of literature.

In 1914, the New York Times asked the most highly regarded authors of the day to name the best short story in the English language. Many of their responses have maintained consistent fame through time. Others have become hidden gems. All are essential literary experiences that will make you love to read again.

These masterpieces are collected here for the first time, masterfully copyedited and with an introduction by Martin Hill Ortiz, PhD.

This volume includes:
An Introduction to the Times survey and the stories
“A Lodging for the Night—A Story of Francis Villon” by Robert Louis Stevenson
“The Outcasts of Poker Flat” by Bret Harte
Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
The Man Who Would Be King by Rudyard Kipling
A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
“The Pavilion on the Links” by Robert Louis Stevenson
“The Maltese Cat” by Rudyard Kipling
“The Murders in the Rue Morgue” by Edgar Allan Poe
“The Purloined Letter” by Edgar Allan Poe
“Will o’ the Mill” by Robert Louis Stevenson
“Wolfert Webber; or, Golden Dreams” by Washington Irving
“The Ring of Thoth” by Arthur Conan Doyle
“The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County” by Mark Twain
“The Door in the Wall” by H. G. Wells
“Gifts of Oblivion” by Dorothy Canfield

Some of the stories you’ll find in Volumes II and III, coming soon:
“Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” by Robert Louis Stevenson
“Rip Van Winkle” by Washington Irving
“The Fall of the House of Usher” by Edgar Allan Poe
“The Necklace” by Guy de Maupassant
The Turn of the Screw by Henry James
“A Journey” by Edith Wharton
“Beyond the Pale” by Rudyard Kipling

Don’t miss them!

The Best Short Stories Chosen in 1914 by the most prominent authors of the day, Volume I, is available in ebook at the following outlets (check back soon for the soft cover edition!)

On Kindle in the USA, Canada, UK, Australia, India, and Japan

In the USA, the UK, and Europe for Nook

Worldwide at Kobo